Great deal – Sharewared http://sharewared.com/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 00:05:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://sharewared.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-29T134115.656-138x136.png Great deal – Sharewared http://sharewared.com/ 32 32 Sunak to meet with Conservative MPs to avoid cost of living turmoil | Rishi sunak https://sharewared.com/sunak-to-meet-with-conservative-mps-to-avoid-cost-of-living-turmoil-rishi-sunak/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 00:05:00 +0000 https://sharewared.com/sunak-to-meet-with-conservative-mps-to-avoid-cost-of-living-turmoil-rishi-sunak/ Rishi Sunak will try to quell growing Tories’ unrest over cost of living as MPs delegations urge him to reverse a planned tax hike and drop VAT on energy bills in exchange for it. savings on the fight against the pandemic. The Chancellor will summon MPs for several evening summits this week as tensions rise […]]]>

Rishi Sunak will try to quell growing Tories’ unrest over cost of living as MPs delegations urge him to reverse a planned tax hike and drop VAT on energy bills in exchange for it. savings on the fight against the pandemic.

The Chancellor will summon MPs for several evening summits this week as tensions rise over pressures facing households from April, with an expected 1.25 percentage point increase in employee national insurance contributions (NIC) and a surge in energy bills once the price cap is revised.

Labor hopes to put pressure on Sunak and Boris Johnson on Tuesday with a binding vote in parliament to cut VAT on home energy bills.

The motion, introduced by Labor during its opposition day debate, guarantees parliamentary time for a bill to enact the cut, a device that means Tory MPs must actively oppose it rather than to abstain.

There are many demands from MPs, but the VAT cut, which Sunak and Johnson previously ruled out in favor of more targeted action, is enjoying “the most widespread support,” according to a veteran Tory.

“It doesn’t hurt that this is something we can do now because of Brexit,” said another high-ranking Tory connected to several key parliamentary lobby groups.

Many are expected to urge the Chancellor to go further and delay the NIC hike from April, which is expected to bring in £ 12bn which Sunak wants to use to reduce NHS waiting lists and fund the new protection system medium-term social.

David Jones, a former Brexit minister, said the pressure on many households would be immense from April.

“Raising this tax at the same time as the cap is removed from energy prices is very difficult. That’s an increase of a few thousand pounds for many families, ”he said.

A backbench MP John Redwood warned Sunak on Monday that his own ambitions depended on his standing within the party on these issues.

“Those who advise that Mr. Sunak should be the next prime minister should tell him that imposing an avalanche of unpopular and reckless tax hikes will undermine that ambition,” he tweeted.

Another MP said he would urge Sunak to drop the increase and focus on saving money on pandemic-related spending, including NHS testing and traceability. “I’m going to urge him to reduce the increase in NICs – £ 12bn, that’s not a lot of money compared to Covid’s current spending. There is a lot of support in the parliamentary party for this.

While not all MPs said they would support revoking the NIC hike, a minister warned that left Sunak exposed.

“The party hates the rise of the NICs. Sunak himself would not have done so except to stave off other spending demands with warnings of further tax hikes. So it’s no wonder he’s under pressure to give it up when there is a hook to do so. The Chancellor must realize that the party and the country are just not where it is when it comes to taxes and spending. “

Johnson said he discussed cost-of-living pressures with Sunak on Sunday evening. “I understand how difficult it is for people, I understand the pressures people face on household finances,” he said on Monday.

“It makes life very hard. And we need to make sure people are aware of all they can do – all the money we’re investing through local councils to help those in trouble, the cold weather payments, the hot house rebate. , the money for retirees.

Cabinet ministers have all but rejected a one-off tax on North Sea oil and gas profits proposed by Labor. Members said it was less of a priority. “Most colleagues think this is counterproductive at a time when we want to encourage foreign investment,” said a former minister.

Johnson’s spokesman said a one-off tax had “not been ruled out” but again hinted that a targeted approach would be taken. “We want an approach that helps those who need it most,” the spokesperson said.

Communities Secretary Michael Gove stressed that the new support measures are likely to target the most vulnerable. “I think the prudent and responsible thing to do is to recognize that we have to take a balanced approach, and a balanced approach means that when we can provide support, we do more to help those who find themselves in the most difficult circumstances,” did he declare. News from the sky.

Ministers have reportedly discussed extending the hot house rebate on the bills of the most vulnerable, but Conservative MPs argue it does not help households enough.

Treasury sources said they were reluctant to increase the tax burden on the oil and gas sector, pointing to additional taxes on the rate of oil and gas extraction and tax rates on profits more than double the other companies.

Labor slammed Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi, who told LBC that “the oil and gas companies … are already in trouble”, although the companies are supposed to report “almost record” revenues in 2021-2022.

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Loretta Skaff Obituary (2022) – Plains Twp., PA https://sharewared.com/loretta-skaff-obituary-2022-plains-twp-pa/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 03:46:05 +0000 https://sharewared.com/loretta-skaff-obituary-2022-plains-twp-pa/ A generation is now over and with much love and sorrow our mom, Loretta Marion Skaff, 94, Plains Twp., Dolly, as she has been affectionately known since birth, fell asleep in the Lord on Wednesday morning. , on January 5, 2022, at Allied Services Hospice, Meade Street, Wilkes-Barre. Born in Plains Township, she was the […]]]>

A generation is now over and with much love and sorrow our mom, Loretta Marion Skaff, 94, Plains Twp., Dolly, as she has been affectionately known since birth, fell asleep in the Lord on Wednesday morning. , on January 5, 2022, at Allied Services Hospice, Meade Street, Wilkes-Barre.

Born in Plains Township, she was the daughter of the late Joseph and Rhoda Faust Moses, Theil Akkar, Lebanon, who emigrated to the United States in the late 1800s. The family was one of the original founding members of the St. Mary’s Antiochene Orthodox Church, Wilkes-Barre. Dolly loved church and never missed a day of prayer.

Dolly had many enduring qualities that she openly imparted to everyone. She will be remembered by family, friends and coworkers as a dedicated and hard worker, a caring person who has also helped various family and friends throughout her life. While she had many qualities, too many to mention, she had a sharp wit, a tender heart, and a beautiful singing voice that could only be heard at home during household chores.

Loretta was a graduate of Plains Memorial High School and worked as a seamstress, cook and waitress and finally in the housekeeping department at the United Penn Bank Building, Wilkes-Barre, for 25 years until her retirement.

Her 36 year old husband, Wadih George Skaff, (Misthaya, Syria) fell asleep in the Lord on July 14, 1992. She now celebrates eternal life with her siblings Joseph Moses Jr., Abraham Moses, Victoria Azain, Helen Biniek, Elias Moses, Emily Achey, Elizabeth Moses, Sadie Barkowitz, Rose Lasiewicki, George Moses, Albert Moses and James Moses; and deceased nieces and nephews.

Survivors include her daughter, Freida Skaff, who resides at the home with her large puppies Bailey and Jackson; sons, David Skaff and his wife Deborah, and the big puppy Koko, Lancaster, and George Skaff, Pittston.

Extended family nieces, nephews and great-nieces and nephews. The Requiem Funeral Liturgy will be held on Monday January 10 at 11:00 am at St. Mary’s Antiochene Orthodox Church, 905 S. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702, with the Right Reverend Father George Alberts, Pastor, officiant.

Interment will take place in the parish cemetery, Hanover Twp. Family and friends can call 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. to church on Monday mornings. For those attending the visitation and / or funeral liturgy, the family requests that you wear masks, regardless of your immunization status. Arrangements entrusted to Corcoran Funeral Home, Inc., 20 South Main Street, Plains, PA 18705.

The family requests that in lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Loretta Skaff Icon Memorial Fund at St. Mary’s Antiochene Orthodox Church, 905 S. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702, in memory of Loretta .

For more information or to leave a message of condolence to Loretta’s family, please visit www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.

Posted by Citizens Voice on January 9, 2022.


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Cardinal Pell’s three-volume prison journal is a spiritual classic https://sharewared.com/cardinal-pells-three-volume-prison-journal-is-a-spiritual-classic/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 08:05:22 +0000 https://sharewared.com/cardinal-pells-three-volume-prison-journal-is-a-spiritual-classic/ It is the story of the prison of a priest subjected to all kinds of troubles and humiliations: strip searches, isolation, screams and beatings by fellow inmates in his dungeon; vicious letters from a neighboring inmate; an Islamic terrorist chanting prayers; days and weeks without the Eucharist, breviary or its Bible; and the harshness of […]]]>

It is the story of the prison of a priest subjected to all kinds of troubles and humiliations: strip searches, isolation, screams and beatings by fellow inmates in his dungeon; vicious letters from a neighboring inmate; an Islamic terrorist chanting prayers; days and weeks without the Eucharist, breviary or its Bible; and the harshness of the judicial process influenced by biased media and public opinion.

These are some of the sufferings endured by a cardinal of the Catholic Church, not in the distant past, but in modern times.

The story of Cardinal George Pell, who was ultimately cleared of all charges against him and released from prison in Australia, is told in his “Prison Journal”, published by Ignatius Press. Although its three volumes total over 1,000 pages, I enjoyed keeping the Cardinal company in the “clink”. (This phrase refers to a letter that Cardinal Pell believes was from a nun who said that if Jesus could be born where they fed the animals, she guessed it was appropriate for a cardinal to spend time “in the heap “.)

Cardinal Pell’s volumes are steeped in subtlety, insight, and reflections on Christian life behind bars. Interwoven with grim details of the day-to-day challenges of detention are beautiful reflections on the scriptures, as well as ominous references to the calls for his condemnation and the reactions of others to them. Among those reactions was a letter from Ireland telling her that a visionary said the Blessed Mother attributed her hardships in Australia to her attempts at financial reform at the Vatican (although Pell admits to being skeptical of private disclosures, he had wondered the same thing.)

The cardinal offers many remarks on the state of the Church, including some painful insights. He is a keen observer of human details. For example, seeing the word “house” scrawled on the window of his cell makes him wonder about the man who wrote it “and if he was bitter.”

“I suspect not,” wrote the cardinal, “because it is my home at the moment and it is not a terrible place.” I’m not sure I agree with his hypothesis, but I admire that he can take it as such.

The Cardin The Reverend Prince has a wide variety of rings and bracelets and Cardinal Pell is careful to respect the accessories). Nevertheless, he takes messages from preachers and letter writers very seriously, and admits his difficulty in forgiving some of his enemies. It is refreshing that the Cardinal recognizes that it is difficult for him to understand that God loves even those who attack the Church as much as he loves those who serve her, “but of course it is true,” he wrote.

I could not help but compare the three volumes to other famous works on prison. The cardinal’s writings sent me to Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s “Letters and Papers from Prison”, for example. Ironically, the “Prison Journal” also reminded me of “De Profundis”, written by Oscar Wilde during his imprisonment for a sex scandal: although Wilde was guilty and Pell innocent, both convey the experience of sophisticated intelligence. highlighting an environment. and people removed from ordinary life.

The first volume ends with waiting for the results of the first call. The second concerns the confirmation by the Court of Appeal of his six-year sentence. The third volume, titled “The High Court frees an innocent man”, kept me in a kind of tension of indirect suffering, especially when the cardinal wrote: “Today I am finishing a year in prison for crimes that I did not commit ”.

The whole experience gave him a lot of compassion for his fellow inmates. One of them wrote the cardinal a letter of support which reminded him of the Good Thief’s defense of Jesus. At the news of the reversal of his convictions, the inmates of the neighboring cells congratulate him and share his happiness. The scene gives “Journal” a touch of poignant grace, especially because the Cardinal believes one of these men was falsely sentenced to a life sentence.

Cardinal Pell was released from prison in April 2020 only to enter the restrictions of the initial COVID-19 lockdown. In a recent interview, the cardinal said his pre-Vatican II seminary prepared him for life in isolation, while his time in prison prepared him for COVID.

I mentioned to a friend of mine that I read the “Journal”. “So he was innocent?” He asked me and then said, “That’s good.” As Jonathan Swift said, “A lie flies and the truth limps after.” This is why these books are so important. Cardinal Pell, who wrote several books and countless chronicles during his ministry, said that writing this “Journal” was the easiest for him in terms of composition.

Fortunately, the “Journal” is easy to read, almost like having a face-to-face with a great pastor of the Church. Ignatius Press is to be commended for the plan to publish the writings, which will be a lasting testimony to the present moment in Church history.


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America’s shortest founding father knew how to save our great corrupt republic https://sharewared.com/americas-shortest-founding-father-knew-how-to-save-our-great-corrupt-republic/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 08:01:44 +0000 https://sharewared.com/americas-shortest-founding-father-knew-how-to-save-our-great-corrupt-republic/ by Stephen Erickson | January 3, 2022 One of the many law firms advertising in my part of Florida proclaims on a large billboard, “Size matters. The crude innuendo is now old and hackneyed. But America’s smallest founding father, James Madison, co-author of the nation’s highest law, reportedly agreed. Size matters a lot. James Madison […]]]>

One of the many law firms advertising in my part of Florida proclaims on a large billboard, “Size matters. The crude innuendo is now old and hackneyed. But America’s smallest founding father, James Madison, co-author of the nation’s highest law, reportedly agreed. Size matters a lot.

James Madison was 5 feet 4 inches tall and had a light build. There is little evidence to suggest that he was particularly concerned with his own physical stature, but as the “father of the American Constitution,” Madison was an intellectual giant who thought a lot about size. In fact, Madison’s thoughts on size can help explain why Americans today tend to be so disgusted with their political system, but often seem utterly incapable of knowing what to do about it.

Be with me on this.

In 1787, Madison and his fellow Founding Fathers proposed replacing the Articles of Confederation with a new constitution with a relatively powerful central government. Anti-federalist critics were appalled. They said it would never work because, as anyone who had studied history knew, republics had to be small, like Greek city-states. The republic proposed by Madison and his federalist colleagues, stretching from New Hampshire to Georgia, would be huge in comparison and was clearly destined to expand further. Anti-Federalists have dismissed Madison as a potential aristocrat of centralizing power, and so is running.

But Madison was thorough and persistent in her argument. The biggest problem faced by all of the republics was their tendency to split into narrow, selfish special interests, which Madison called “factions.” These selfish interests can be of various kinds. They can be political, religious, ideological or commercial, the latter being particularly common. Such narrow selfish interests are normal in a free society and can only be crushed by oppression – which, in theory, at least, everyone is against.

Madison has overturned conventional wisdom about the proper size of a republic. He argued that small republics easily became corrupt or tyrannical because it was relatively easy for a group or interest to form a majority, capture the government, and oppress a minority. In a large continental republic like the United States, however, there would be so many competing interests that probably none would become powerful enough to take control of the government. Instead, these many interests would verify each other.

Madison’s concept that interests checked and balanced each other, therefore, was not only applied to different branches of government, as we are taught in school, but was seen as a feature of constitutional design. which would end up in American society itself. Our great American republic, Madison concludes, had a good chance of being just, stable, and enduring.

Madison was so enamored with his theory of the relative security of a great republic that he obsessively argued it over and over again, to anyone who wanted to listen. The argument appears in Madison’s notes he kept while serving in the Continental Congress, in his personal correspondence, in the procuratorial records of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, and most famous, in “Federalist No. 10. “

Madison’s theory held up fairly well for the first 60 years of the American republic, until an extremely powerful faction – the slave-based economy of the Southern States – revolted, resulting in the Civil War. , which to date is both the nation’s bloodiest war and its most epic contest with special interest.

Today, a voracious horde of selfish commercial and political interests is gorging themselves with power at the expense of the public. The common and long-term welfare of the American people is an afterthought at best.

After the Civil War, the power of the federal government began to increase. Progressives demanded government oversight to tackle various social issues. The New Deal and the Great Society expanded the role of government in the economy and created extensive benefit programs. The Cold War gave birth to the military-industrial complex.

For better or for worse, depending on one’s policy, the federal government today is several orders of magnitude larger and more powerful than that envisioned by Madison and her fellow founders. And that reality throws a big wrench into Madison’s plan for a government that can resist selfish interests. It is no longer necessary for a selfish interest to gain the support of the majority to corrupt the government and thus subvert the common good, for when the government is immensely powerful it can simultaneously serve countless selfish interests.

Today, a voracious horde of selfish commercial and political interests is gorging themselves with power at the expense of the public. The common and long-term welfare of the American people is an afterthought at best. The public understood this well. When asked in an NBC / Wall Street Journal poll, over 80% of respondents agreed with the following unassigned statement:

A small group in the nation’s capital reaped the rewards of government while the people bore the cost.

The quote, by the way, is taken from Donald Trump’s inaugural address. Would 80% still agree if they knew it was Trump who said it?

Probably not. Which indicates another sizing issue. In our time, it is not just the government that is corrupted by interests. The large institutions that produce the knowledge, information and ideas upon which a republic depends are also compromised. The media, which have at least once taken the necessary steps to take journalistic standards seriously, now behave openly like other businesses; relentless sensationalism and partisan narratives fuel a view-and-click business model that sows division, even hatred, among citizens. Tidal waves of corporate money and political governments have corrupted universities, funding narrowly limited programs. Independent scientific research is more and more rare, especially when it is expensive.

The free market economy of the United States has always been a haven for loose interests. Economically, the formula for channeling selfishness has been wonderfully productive. But when corporate interests take hold of government, the free market is no longer free and safe for consumers. When politicians come to terms with corporate and other professional interests to form a well-established political class, the government no longer represents the people.

It should terrify anyone outside the system and shame anyone with a conscience that is.

Our diminutive “Father of the Constitution” James Madison would have something great to say about all of this. In fact, he said it. Once again, Madison feared what selfish interests might do to her beloved American republic. He believed that in a great republic, interests would stop each other and that none would become powerful enough to take over the government. It was a point he kept repeating so much that it had to be boring at parties.

But Madison once revealed a grim fear he never expressed in public, as it would have undermined his signature argument over the relative safety of a greater republic. To her friend Thomas Jefferson, Madison wrote:

Just as in a sphere that is too small, oppressive combinations can too easily form against the weaker party, so in a sphere that is too large, a defensive concert [author’s emphasis] can be made too difficult against the oppression of those entrusted with administration.

By “defensive concert,” Madison does not refer to oboes and violins. What he means is that in a large and diverse society, people are easily divided into bickering factions when, on the contrary, unity is needed to resist corruption, or worse. Madison’s foreknowledge is astounding since this is exactly where “we the people” find ourselves today, in need of concerted action against public institutions captured by vested interests.

Future citizen leaders need to take a step back and see what is really going on.

Ralph Nader, the famous consumer advocate, channeled his inner Madison when he said in 2014: “It was pretty clear to me many years ago that power structures believe in division and dominance by hijacking attention to areas where different groups agree where they disagree. . “At the time, Nader was promoting a new book, Unstoppable: the emerging Left-Right Alliance to dismantle the corporate state. The subtitle was unfortunately premature.

Today, whenever an isolated leader stands up to truly challenge the system, he or she is likely to be demonized and demonetized. Platforms are taken down, public figures soiled, reputations attacked, voices censored, private lives harassed and layoffs. For real leaders whose only desire is to serve the public, the public square has become an increasingly dangerous and authoritarian place.

We need, in Madison’s words, “a defensive concert.”

The first step in ending this rampant corruption and growing authoritarianism should be obvious: a unified opposition balanced by genuine leaders on the left and on the right. True leaders must be found in our great cacophonous nation. Currently, dissenting voices are crammed into their silos, building their own brands when they should unite to build a movement together. Each voice alone is too small to make a real difference, but coming together and organizing could change everything. And it is necessary.

Madison would argue that such a movement should have a clear overall mission: to remove from the political system any incitement that promotes service to selfish interests, or factions, to the detriment of the common and long-term good of the American people. For starters, it means ending political careerism and making it impossible for elected officials to take money, or otherwise benefit, from the various commercial and other selfish interests that they are supposed to regulate.

It is a huge and complicated task, but it has to start somewhere. The people are ready. This is the leadership we need for the concerted action that James Madison, the little founder with his big ideas, begs us to take.


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What the Miami Dolphins say about the Tennessee Titans for week 17 https://sharewared.com/what-the-miami-dolphins-say-about-the-tennessee-titans-for-week-17/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 16:13:43 +0000 https://sharewared.com/what-the-miami-dolphins-say-about-the-tennessee-titans-for-week-17/ Earlier in the week, Miami Dolphins head coach Brian Flores opened up about his relationship with Tennessee Titans head coach Mike Vrabel, which dates back to their days with the New England Patriots. In 2008, Flores was special teams assistant with the Pats, and Vrabel was in his final year with the team. Flores notes […]]]>

Earlier in the week, Miami Dolphins head coach Brian Flores opened up about his relationship with Tennessee Titans head coach Mike Vrabel, which dates back to their days with the New England Patriots.

In 2008, Flores was special teams assistant with the Pats, and Vrabel was in his final year with the team.

Flores notes that while he was Vrabel’s coach, he didn’t coach the then-veteran player much. Instead, it was Vrabel who trained him.

“I didn’t train Vrabel. I would say he probably trained me more as a young man in New England when he was there and he was a player ”, said Flores. “He was pretty much a coach on the pitch at the time. I certainly haven’t trained him but I have a lot of respect for him. I think his tenacity, his insight, I think it shows and you see it in the way his team are playing. This is someone I call a friend. I have a lot of respect for him. “

Flores has also entered into the other relations with Tennessee that he has. Find out what he had to say about it and what the rest of the Dolphins have to say about their Week 17 opponent, the Titans.

Sam Navarro-USA TODAY Sports

“I think they have a lot of guys in their staff that I’ve worked with. Jon Robinson, their CEO. [Director of Player Personnel] Monti Ossenfort, who is a guy that I kind of found in the scouting game. [Vice President of Player Personnel] Ryan Cowden.

“There’s a lot of connection there with the Titans. I think they did a lot of really good things there building a team, building the culture. Lots of things we would like to emulate.

Christopher Hanewinckel-USA TODAY Sports

“Ryan did a great job for these guys from a leadership standpoint, from a communication standpoint. He throws the ball well, he runs it well, he’s a good runner. he does a very good job for them.

Christopher Hanewinckel-USA TODAY Sports

“He’s one of the most awesome guys I’ve seen this year. One of the best – I would say one of the best defensive players in the league. Big, strong, physical, high motor, hard to block, hard to overtake. But they have a lot of good players on their fronts really across the board – (Bud) Dupree, Rashaan Evans, Zach Cunningham who they’ve claimed from the Texans. They also have a lot of good players at the back, offensively too. It’s a good team, a well-trained team. But (Jeffery) Simmons is definitely at the forefront.

Jim Brown-USA TODAY Sports

“I watched a few clips of that game and saw that there were guys slipping, so I told our team about it. I think it’s more focused on shoulders over knees, knees over toes – those kind of basic fundamentals you’d hear in Pop Warner. Balance, play on the inside of your outside foot.

“Things like that. Just reminders and things that we really have to be careful of on any surface, but definitely on a wet or slippery surface. These are just reminders you give your players. every coach is – when you’re dealing with a surface or things like that – that’s something you need to mention to your team to at least be aware of. ”

Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports

“I didn’t speak to him directly, but I definitely followed him. When he was here, he was a leading example. He always did the right thing. He is a family man and I will never forget him.

“When he left I was always trying to make him okay, but you know Sunday is like that. You have to turn the page and he’s on the other side now, but he’s always been a great teammate, a great guy. Sunday is just that business is business.

Sam Navarro-USA TODAY Sports

“They have a good defensive front. I think every week it’s always the same song and dance when it comes to defensive fronts. I think they are really talented and we have our hands full there.

Sam Navarro-USA TODAY Sports

“It’s another solid defense. He plays well together, trusts himself, trusts his technique, trusts himself. This is another great defense that we are going to play, just like last week. Just do what we can. We just have to fight for every yard, take what’s there and do our job. Don’t try to do too much, do whatever is within our means.

Rich Barnes-USA TODAY Sports

“It’s definitely a challenge, but that’s what the film is for. You study your opponent every week and see who you think he’s going to get up there. You have to study each guy and know what each guy’s fight is and that’s where you go forward and focus on that. This is usually what I focus on.

Photo AP / Tony Avelar

“You have to put a little pressure on him. I have the impression that the front must put pressure on him. Just dealing with him as a teammate, just being here, just knowing some of the weak things for him, so I feel like that’s one of them we have to do.

Syndication: Tennessee

“It would be great, but we’re trying to take it one day at a time, I would say. I feel like he’s definitely improved over the years just seeing him play and I expect to see him do a lot of good things when we play him.

Christopher Hanewinckel-USA TODAY Sports

“I feel like him (AJ Brown) and Julio (Jones) and (Nick) Westbrook (-Ikhine), he’s a sneaky guy and I think he does a really good job. They have a good receiving body I would say. Very physical guys and we just have to be ready to come and play on Sunday.

Photo AP / John Amis

“I have the impression that he is very physical. I feel like he’s attacking the ball and I also feel like he’s Ryan’s favorite target. He’s definitely a great catcher, I would say in my book, and I have to give him as much respect as watching him in a movie and knowing what he’s good at. I just have to do my job.

Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports

“Yes, I remember that game. It was a crazy long game. We were in the locker room waiting, then we got out and came back. There was a lot going on.

Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports

“The atmosphere of the team, everyone is excited to play against the Titans. It’s a big game. He’s a really tough opponent. They have great offense, defense, special teams. They are really well supervised. This is what we do. We play football and take advantage of the time that we have. Just have a good time while doing it.

Christopher Hanewinckel-USA TODAY Sports

“He’s a great athletic and consistent receiver. He’s one of the best in the league and it shows week after week. We just go to the game plan for that and go over there and execute. He’s a hell of a player. He’s been a hell of a player in the league, has a great career, so I’m delighted to play him. I grew up watching it so it’s gonna be a good time, I’m gonna have fun.

AP Photo / Wilfredo Lee

“Like you said, he’s (Kevin Byard) a pro Bowler so he’s really good at what he does. In the back, he’s their communicator. He gets guys lined up at the back. He communicates where everyone needs to be, who is pushing, who needs to replace him, all that. So he’s the captain for them at the back and I think he’s done a really good job so we absolutely have to know where he is and who he’s covering at all times and look pretty much elsewhere for our clashes.

Photo AP / Wade Payne

“Yeah. I mean Ryan (Tannehill) isn’t playing around or he’s going to pressure me so I’m not going to watch a movie about Ryan. But I have a lot of respect for the things that he is. has done throughout his career, his football career being here and also what he does there in Tennessee. But yeah, we’re focusing on what their defense can do to stop us. Don’t watch Ryan play. to the defense.

AP Photo / Matt Durisko

“The inner pressure really takes its toll on the game both in the running and in the passing game. In the running game, because the holes won’t be there, the runner has to bounce it by forcing his edge players – who in reality their contained players will more than likely be there. And for the passing game, it is difficult to get into the pocket with internal pressure. But I’m pretty good friends with Jeffery. We played against each other while he was in Mississippi State and I in Alabama. Great player, good person, but we understand that it will be a difficult task for us offensively to know where he is at all times and to block him.

Rich Barnes-USA TODAY Sports

“I really like Ryan. I am happy with its success. He’s a good guy, a good player. Like I said, I’m happy with his success and can’t wait for us to face his team this week.

Rich Barnes-USA TODAY Sports

“We just need to prepare for it and focus on it. They do a lot of good things in the racing game, the action game, the flashback. It’s a full attack and we’ll have a big job to do this week. They also have a lot of great players on this attack. It will be a 60 minute ball game.

Sam Navarro-USA TODAY Sports

“They are really good. Obviously Jeffery is the star of it all, but they have very good, solid defense, especially their forward. They are big, they are fast, they are powerful, they play smart and they play with a lot of effort. They present a lot of good challenges for us, which is exciting. It gives us a chance to go against the best and expect a lot of good stuff. Like I said, they’re big, physical, they fly, they play smart, and they play with tremendous effort.

Jon Durr-USA TODAY Sports

“I would say when you start with Ryan Tannehill you start with intangibles. I think he’s definitely a hardened quarterback. He has the arm to make all the throws and does all the throws. He can beat you with his feet, whether it’s a designed run or he’s making a play to extend his legs in the passing game.

“He makes good decisions. He reads well. I would say if – I think their offensive philosophy is that they’re going to run the ball, they’re going to use the playing action, they’re going to get into some manageable third downs and they’re going to try to carry you down and they’re going to play. for 60 minutes because it’s a strong and physical team. They’re tough and I think Ryan Tannehill embodies it all.

Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

“It’s a good defense. They know what they are doing. They are healthy. They obviously play well at all three levels from level one with the d line, level two with linebackers or nickel and level three with secondary. These guys play well together, they communicate well, they have really quick reactions to what they see and they are in the right place. We’re going to have to run for four quarters here for this game.


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Texans great Andre Johnson makes finalists shortlist for Pro Football Hall of Fame https://sharewared.com/texans-great-andre-johnson-makes-finalists-shortlist-for-pro-football-hall-of-fame/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 23:37:11 +0000 https://sharewared.com/texans-great-andre-johnson-makes-finalists-shortlist-for-pro-football-hall-of-fame/ Andre Johnson, one of the NFL’s most prolific wide receivers in a 14-year career, is one step away from being elected to the Professional Football Hall of Fame. Johnson, who played his first 12 seasons with the Texans and is in his first year of eligibility, made the Modern Era finalist list that was announced […]]]>

Andre Johnson, one of the NFL’s most prolific wide receivers in a 14-year career, is one step away from being elected to the Professional Football Hall of Fame.

Johnson, who played his first 12 seasons with the Texans and is in his first year of eligibility, made the Modern Era finalist list that was announced by the Hall of Fame on Thursday.

“It is an incredible feeling and a huge honor to be included among the finalists,” said Johnson. “I would like to thank the committee for voting for me as a finalist.

“I didn’t come to Texans saying I wanted to be in the Hall of Fame. I wanted to be a great player and play the game the right way. I think being a finalist shows that all of the hard work and dedication to my craft wasn’t something I took for granted. I can’t wait to see what will happen.

Johnson’s next hurdle to be part of the 2022 class will come on January 18, when 48 members of the selection committee will vote for up to five Modern Era finalists. The results will be revealed at the NFL Honors Show on February 10 in Los Angeles, site of Super Bowl LVI.

The selection committee will also consider wide receiver Cliff Branch, the late Houston native and Worthing High School graduate who was the lead nominee, as well as coach Dick Vermeil and contributor Art McNally, longtime referee. date and supervisor of NFL officials.

To be inducted into the Hall of Fame, finalists must receive 80% of the vote.

“I think it’s just great for Andre,” Texans president and CEO Cal McNair said. “I’m very happy but not surprised because André so deserves to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Being a finalist says a lot about the level of your game. To make the Hall of Fame would be a huge honor for Andre and the Texans.

“He’s made so many important plays for us over the years. He went against the defenses with game plans designed to stop him. He faced the best defensive backs in every game and he always produced for us. He deserves all the distinctions he receives.

• Jared Allen, DE (Chiefs, Vikings, Bears, Panthers)
• Willie Anderson, OT (Bengals, Ravens)
• Ronde Barber, CB (Buccaneers)
• Tony Boselli, OT (Jaguars)
• LeRoy Butler, S (Packers)
• Cliff Branch, WR (Raiders, senior candidate)
• Devin Hester, WR / KR / PR (Bears, Falcons, Crows)
• Torry Holt, WR (Rams, Jaguars)
• Andre Johnson, WR (Texans, Colts, Titans)
• Art McNally, contributor (referee, supervisor of officials)
• Sam Mills, LB (Saints, Panthers)
• Richard Seymour, DE (Patriots, Raiders)
• Zach Thomas, LB (Dolphins, Cowboys)
• Dick Vermeil, coach (Eagles, Rams, Chiefs)
• DeMarcus Ware, LB / DE (Cowboys, Broncos)
• Reggie Wayne, WR (Colts)
• Patrick Willis, LB (49ers)
• Bryant Young, DT (49ers)


Johnson, the third overall pick in 2003, was the Texans’ first Ring of Honor inductee at NRG Stadium, which also includes the late franchise founder Bob McNair.

During his 14-year career, Johnson caught 1,062 passes for 14,185 yards and 70 touchdowns. With the Texans, he totaled 1,012 receptions for 13,597 yards and 64 touchdowns. He’s had 51 games with at least 100 yards.

Johnson has been elected to seven Pro Bowls and has been on the All-Pro squad three times.

Johnson was one of three receivers who made the finalist list, joining Reggie Wayne and Torry Holt.

“They were both great players,” Johnson said. “I watched Torry when he was in college and with the Rams. It was one of my favorite receivers to watch.

“Reggie and I played together (at the University of Miami). He’s like a brother to me. Competing against him and the Colts twice a year, we were always trying to fight. We had to play well to give our teams a chance to win.

Other modern-day finalists are defensive end Jared Allen, offensive tackle Willie Anderson, cornerback Ronde Barber, offensive tackle Tony Boselli, safety LeRoy Butler, returns specialist Devin Hester, linebacker Sam Mills, defensive lineman Richard Seymour, linebacker Zach Thomas, defensive end DeMarcus Ware, linebacker Patrick Willis and defensive end Bryant Young.

After hearing he was on the finalist list, Johnson paid tribute to one of his former coaches, Gary Kubiak.

“I owe him so much because he meant so much to my career,” Johnson said. “Coach Kubes was trying hard to give the ball to his playmakers. He believed in me.

“When he got here things took off for me. He expected a lot from me and I was up to the challenge.

Kubiak took over a 2-14 squad in 2006. He coached Johnson for eight seasons. They helped the Texans win AFC South titles and playoff games in 2011 and 2012.

“I’m so happy for Andre because he so deserves to be in the Hall of Fame,” Kubiak said. “I am very proud of his accomplishments. When we got there, we put a lot of money into him. I was very demanding of him and he always responded as we wanted.

“André has done so much for the franchise. He raised the team to put us in a position to make the playoffs and compete for a championship. He’s one of the greatest players I’ve coached, and there’s no doubt in my mind that he deserves to be in the Hall of Fame because he’s one of the greatest receivers of. the story.

Johnson’s stats compare favorably with those of Hall of Fame receivers.

Playing primarily with starting quarterbacks David Carr and Matt Schaub, Johnson has had five seasons with at least 100 receptions. It’s one more than Jerry Rice and Marvin Harrison and two more than Cris Carter and Randy Moss.

Johnson had three 1,500-yard seasons, tied for second with Harrison, one behind Rice.

Johnson and Harrison had three seasons with at least 100 receptions and 1,500 yards, one more than Rice and two more than Moss, Michael Irvin, Isaac Bruce and Calvin Johnson.


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Bears reporter Jeff Dickerson dies at 44, network says https://sharewared.com/bears-reporter-jeff-dickerson-dies-at-44-network-says/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 07:06:09 +0000 https://sharewared.com/bears-reporter-jeff-dickerson-dies-at-44-network-says/ Jeff Dickerson, an ESPN reporter who covered the Chicago Bears, died Tuesday, the network reported. He was 44 years old. The Bears posted on Twitter that the team were “heartbroken” to learn of Dickerson’s death and called him a “consummate professional.” “JD was very proud of his coverage of the Bears for 20 years,” the […]]]>

Jeff Dickerson, an ESPN reporter who covered the Chicago Bears, died Tuesday, the network reported. He was 44 years old.

The Bears posted on Twitter that the team were “heartbroken” to learn of Dickerson’s death and called him a “consummate professional.”

“JD was very proud of his coverage of the Bears for 20 years,” the team said. “He was a real professional and an even better person.”

FILE: General views of historic Soldier Field built in 1924, home of the Chicago Bears since 1971. (Photo by Patrick Gorski / Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

JOHN MADDEN DEAD AT 85

Larry Mayer, a writer for the Bears site, posted that Dickerson’s wife died in 201. They left behind an 11-year-old son.

ESPN reported that Dickerson died of complications from colon cancer while being treated at the “same hospice facility as his wife, Caitlin, died two years earlier.”

He is survived by his son and both parents.

ESPN colleagues praised Jeff Dickerson for his professionalism and determination in the face of adversity.

ESPN colleagues praised Jeff Dickerson for his professionalism and determination in the face of adversity.
(ESPN)

The report praised Dickerson for maintaining a positive attitude throughout his treatment and becoming an inspiration to his colleagues.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I don’t know of anyone I have met in my 54 years of life who has handled adversity over the past decade with more grace, strength and dignity than Jeff Dickerson,” said Tom Waddle, the host of ESPN 1000. “I know a lot of people go through [stuff]. I do. I am sympathetic to it all. But what Jeff Dickerson has had to go through in the past decade is cruel. “


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Loss of confidence in doctors https://sharewared.com/loss-of-confidence-in-doctors/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 12:01:06 +0000 https://sharewared.com/loss-of-confidence-in-doctors/ Editor’s Note: The past year has been one of the most difficult on record for American physicians. After the lockdowns and the telehealth wave of 2020, the year 2021 has been a strange one. While things have returned to “normal” as most practices have returned to seeing patients in person, the COVID-19 pandemic and its […]]]>

Editor’s Note: The past year has been one of the most difficult on record for American physicians. After the lockdowns and the telehealth wave of 2020, the year 2021 has been a strange one. While things have returned to “normal” as most practices have returned to seeing patients in person, the COVID-19 pandemic and its challenges remain. Like every year, Medical Economics® questioned our audience to find out what the major challenges were. By far the primary response was “administrative burdens” including staffing, pre-clearances, and electronic health records (EHRs). We’ve decided to take a closer look at what these burdens entail, to help physicians prepare for whatever challenges 2022 will bring. Here is number five.

Doctors often complain that, like the late comedian Rodney Dangerfield, they “get no respect.” But when it comes to respect and trust, medicine and its practitioners fare better than many other aspects of American society.

In a 2019 Pew Research Center survey, 74% of people said they had a “mostly positive” opinion of doctors. In contrast, only 35% said they had “a great deal of confidence” or a “fair amount” of confidence that elected officials would act in the best interest of the public, and 46% said the same of business leaders.

Yet trust in doctors has declined. In a 2017 Sermo survey, 87% of doctors said patients trusted them less than they did a decade earlier.

The trend is particularly pronounced among young Americans. A Morning Consult survey from November 2021 found that 74% of baby boomers do ‘a part’ or ‘a lot’ of the healthcare system, but that number drops to 44% among Gen Z – those born in the late 1990s. 1990s and early 2010s.

What caused this erosion of trust in doctors and medicine in general? According to experts, this partly reflects the loss of American confidence in all institutions that began with the Vietnam War and Watergate. But there are also reasons specific to medicine. Perhaps most important of these is the limited time that primary care physicians working for large hospital systems – now the majority – can spend with patients.

Bioethicist Stephen Post, Ph.D., said Medical economics® in 2018 that many hospital systems, where the majority of primary care physicians now practice, require physicians to see an average of eight patients in 30 minutes. “With this pace, it’s extremely difficult to build trust and create meaningful relationships,” Post said. To make the problem worse, patients often do not stay with the same doctor long enough to build trust; doctors leave (or are excluded) from insurance networks, or employers change insurance companies in search of lower costs.

Another factor contributing to the erosion of trust is the immediate availability of medical and wellness information, as well as information and assessments for healthcare providers, on the internet and through social media. A 2015 Medical economics® noted that about 5% of all searches on Google were related to health and the percentage has almost certainly increased since then. “We have seen an explosion in the type of information ordinary people can access about their own health and from sources such as medical journals and clinical trial results,” said the author and engagement consultant. of patients Jan Oldenburg. Medical economics® in 2019.

Oldenburg and other experts argue that while this “patient empowerment” enables patients to become more actively involved in their health and well-being, it also means that they are less likely to have significant confidence in the diagnosis of disease. ‘a doctor or follow a treatment plan that patients before the Internet.

Patients’ confidence in their health care providers is further weakened by soaring costs of care. Although doctors are not primarily responsible for the problem, they are often the ones who suffer the most anger from patients. Eighty-seven percent of physicians responding to a 2016 survey Medical economics® reported that their practices were seeing more angry patients than a year or two ago, and 56% said financial problems were the number one cause of patient anger. In some patients, this anger takes the form of believing that their doctor is recommending unnecessary tests or procedures to make more money.

Of course, for large groups within American society – particularly people of color – distrust of physicians and the health care system has long been and frequently justified. A 2003 Institute of Medicine report on racial and ethnic disparities in health care found evidence that “stereotypes, prejudices and uncertainty on the part of health care providers can all contribute to a unequal treatment ”. In addition, according to the report, white clinicians who do not believe they are prejudiced “generally demonstrate unconscious implicit negative racial attitudes and stereotypes.” Many public health experts believe this mistrust among members of the black and Hispanic communities contributed to their initial reluctance to be vaccinated against COVID-19 compared to whites (although the gap has since narrowed).

Building – or rebuilding – trust with patients is not easy, especially given the time and financial constraints most physicians face. Nevertheless, it is possible. The process begins by maximizing the time available to be spent with patients, for example by delegating to staff members tasks that reduce the time spent on doctor-patient interactions. Then use the time to listen. “Let patients talk about the personal aspects of their illness, then add an affirmative comment like ‘This must be very difficult,'” Post advises.

Dhruv Khullar, MD, MPP, New York City internist and author of a New York Times article on trust, reminds doctors that they can no longer expect automatic trust, but “if we work hard to demonstrate that we are trustworthy, patients will trust us over time.”


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More on charitable giving rather than more toys – Monterey Herald https://sharewared.com/more-on-charitable-giving-rather-than-more-toys-monterey-herald/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 19:59:14 +0000 https://sharewared.com/more-on-charitable-giving-rather-than-more-toys-monterey-herald/ Question: I really enjoyed your column last week on giving to charity for the holidays and letting your grandchildren know you made the donation and why. The reader had written that her grandchildren already had too many toys and that she wanted to give them something really meaningful for Christmas. Like you, when our grandchildren […]]]>

Question: I really enjoyed your column last week on giving to charity for the holidays and letting your grandchildren know you made the donation and why. The reader had written that her grandchildren already had too many toys and that she wanted to give them something really meaningful for Christmas. Like you, when our grandchildren were born, we opened an account for each of them on the day of their birth. However, we wonder if Social Security will be there for them when they reach retirement age, so my wife and I wanted to make sure they had something saved. On the day of their birth, we made the then eligible donation of $ 14,000 into a well-diversified investment account for each grandchild and just let it “roll”. At an average annual rate of return of 6%, by the time the grandchild turns 60, everyone will have almost half a million dollars! Stock returns are, on average, above 6%, so we think they will have a lot more. No question just wanted to share.

Responnse: Well done! Excellent strategy. Parents often ask in this kind of situation whether they should share account information with the grandchild or keep it private. Sharing gives you a great opportunity to introduce your grandchild to investing and the power of compound interest. However, some grandchildren may want the money sooner and pressure parents or grandparents to give them the account before they turn 60. It’s a personal decision. Read on for more gift ideas provided by readers:

* We have a donor advised fund and we donate to it every year. When our grandchildren are around 10 years old, we start teaching them about annual DAF giving and think it is a great tool for them to learn how to research a charity to make sure it is well run. . It also allows them to give to causes they want to support. The Monterey County Community Foundation has been a huge help to us in the creation of the fund and the annual “education” of our grandchildren.

* My husband and I don’t have any extra money, so setting up accounts for the grandchildren is not an option. What we do is they volunteer with us when we do charitable work. A few years ago we worked on Thanksgiving serving food to the homeless. What’s really gratifying is that every Thanksgiving since, one or other of our now young adult grandchildren has been “absent” from the family Thanksgiving dinner because they volunteer. We couldn’t be prouder!

* Being a teacher all my life, I think the gift of reading is extremely important for children. Every year I give my grandchildren books for Christmas and we read them while their parents cook dinner. Then I make a point of asking the grandchildren to talk about the story over dinner. I think it teaches them to like books and also to be an interesting interlocutor at the table. They love tradition and we look forward to it every year.

* At Christmas, I give my grandchildren a coupon for “a day with grandmother”. When they cash their coupon, either I take them to a museum, show them how to plant a garden, how to knit or something new and fun. They enjoy it and gain knowledge or a new skill every year.

Thanks everyone for these wonderful ideas on how to give a life changing gift for your grandchildren!

Liza Horvath has over 30 years of estate planning and trust experience and is a Chartered Professional Trustee. Liza is currently President of Monterey Trust Management. This is not legal or tax advice. If you have a question, call (831) 646-5262 or email liza@montereytrust.com


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In the face of burnout and changing revenue models, healthcare industry turns to augmented intelligence for operational improvements https://sharewared.com/in-the-face-of-burnout-and-changing-revenue-models-healthcare-industry-turns-to-augmented-intelligence-for-operational-improvements/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 17:29:00 +0000 https://sharewared.com/in-the-face-of-burnout-and-changing-revenue-models-healthcare-industry-turns-to-augmented-intelligence-for-operational-improvements/ DUBLIN, December 23, 2021– (COMMERCIAL THREAD)–The “Augmented Intelligence for Healthcare Operations Market Trend Report 2021” has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. This AI for Healthcare Operations report predicts a market poised to experience explosive growth with a 40% CAGR over the next 5 years as solutions mature and more use cases demonstrate a return on […]]]>

DUBLIN, December 23, 2021– (COMMERCIAL THREAD)–The “Augmented Intelligence for Healthcare Operations Market Trend Report 2021” has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

This AI for Healthcare Operations report predicts a market poised to experience explosive growth with a 40% CAGR over the next 5 years as solutions mature and more use cases demonstrate a return on investment.

The COVID-19 pandemic has irrevocably accelerated the adoption of artificial and augmented enterprise intelligence (collectively AI) solutions in healthcare to modernize operations. Burnout and staff shortages, leave scheduling, supply chain disruptions, new contracting models and other operational challenges have all helped to quickly make these technologies necessary for many to operate. health organizations (HCO).

The report, Augmented intelligence for healthcare operations, examines an emerging niche of the industry on the verge of explosive growth as more “mature” solutions effectively demonstrate the return on investment of their client implementations.

Many vendors are rapidly moving towards creating platforms that are end-to-end solutions for operations, rather than just developing one-off solutions. The many acquisitions and investments that have taken place over the past 18 months show that buyers and developers are focused on early financial gains, competing in RCM operations and functional areas where return on investment can be easily quantified. . Additionally, the nature of some of these solutions is robust enough that vendors consider taking risks in their contracts, offering ROI-based contracts for their services as they assert the value of their platform. form.

Asked about the research findings, senior analyst Jody Ranck said this about current market trends: “While there has been a lot of attention on virtual care and the pandemic, a lesser-known story is the important role of AI for operating platforms in helping hospitals and providers meet financial challenges. , planning and supply chain issues posed by COVID-19. The solutions available today are surprisingly more mature than many other application areas for AI and machine learning. “

A representative cohort of ten main suppliers offering solutions to meet these needs is presented in detail. The organizations that have developed products that meet the parameters of this research are: Change Healthcare (Flagship Vendor for RCM), Codoxo, Health Catalyst, Hospital IQ, Infinitus, LeanTaaS (Flagship Vendor for Asset Optimization), Olive, Premier, Qventus (Flagship Vendor supplier for hospital operations) and Waystar. Smart money is seizing the potential market to reduce healthcare overhead and administrative waste, reflected in recent investments and M&A activity in this space.

To this day, this space is still largely untouched by the larger incumbent platform providers, so expect acquisition behavior over the coming year from these stakeholders.

Although relatively early in its implementation days, the dividends from investing in the operations space are starting to emerge. As an essential element in the overall picture of digital transformation, AI4Ops will continue to ease the burden on an already stressed healthcare system and should provide a testing ground to develop confidence in AI offerings within of the health sector. Although risks remain in implementing these solutions, they are not as severe as the potential risks posed by clinical decision support or other care-focused solutions; although all stakeholders should always be vigilant when checking for biases in their algorithms.

Healthcare administrators and executives looking for ways to improve their business processes will find this report useful in assessing the right vendor and solution for their organization’s needs. Operations managers can expect to find clear breakdowns on AI offerings that will alleviate many of the constraints their organizations face today. Investors, solution providers will find value in the contours of market trends as well as in the competitive landscape, and market sizing projections will help target customers for their products.

This report takes a closer look at several leading solutions in the AI4Ops space and provides insight into market trends and dynamics as it evolves after the pandemic.

Research has focused on the largest segments of the operations spectrum, from supply chains to hospital operations. We have also included a small number of supply chain and RPA providers which we believe are a large segment, but smaller than RCM and hospital operations.

The report covers a number of operational use cases, including the following:

  • Discharge planning: emergency management, exit barriers, perioperative

  • Hospital operations: Staffing, Hospital beds, Surgery, Asset optimization

  • Revenue Cycle Management (RCM): Intelligent claims management / refusal prevention, Prior authorizations / eligibility, Patient payment capacity, Fraud detection

  • Supply chains: number of predictive cases, supply chain forecasting, prioritization of resources

Many healthcare facilities use point solutions for operations when they initially engage with AI, but major vendors are building end-to-end, multi-functional platforms for operations and RCM functional areas.

The report provides clear examples of how healthcare leaders can learn from other industries such as airlines and airport capacity management to improve their own operations. We also highlight vendors who excel in the change management component of AI4Ops, which is critical to successful digital transformation.

As an essential part of the digital transformation, AI4Ops will continue to ease the burden on an already stressed healthcare system and should provide a testing ground for building confidence in AI offerings within the healthcare industry. .

Healthcare administrators and executives looking for ways to improve their business processes will find this report useful in assessing the right vendor and solution for their organization’s needs. Operations managers can expect to find clear breakdowns on AI offerings that will alleviate many of the constraints their organizations face today. Investors, solution providers will find value in the contours of market trends as well as in the competitive landscape, and market sizing projections will help target customers for their products.

Main topics covered:

Key points to remember

Common buyers

Evolution of technology and deployment and use strategies

Obstacles and challenges to adoption

Industry Context

  • Business / Economic

  • Politics

  • Regulations

  • Societal

Market forecast

Supplier categories

Product and market categories and descriptions

Market categories

Bearings Analyst

Supplier profiles

For more information on this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/n31gvl

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211223005375/en/

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press@researchandmarkets.com

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